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August 27, 2006

Headteacher who never taught again after daring to criticise multicultural

Filed under: Multi Kulti, UK — limewoody @ 7:35 am

Early yesterday afternoon, Ray Honeyford was listening with unconcealed delight to the radio commentary from the C&G Cup final at Lord’s cricket ground as the Sussex batsmen, already 68 for 5, battled to find some form. Lancashire, Mr Honeyford, noted cheerfully, were doing rather well, as he watched through the window while his wife, Angela, and a friend tended to the garden. “My wife does all the gardening,” Mr Honeyford says, “partly because I’m too lazy, partly because she doesn’t want my help.” He motions towards the potted flowers that sit on the polished table in the centre of his living room. He says he cannot name them, this by way of proving his horticultural ignorance.

The plants are Angela’s, as are the prints of the Cezanne paintings and the black and white family pictures that line the walls of the living room of their modest house in Bury, Manchester. There are some framed medals of Mr Honeyford’s uncle, a “Manchester lad like me”, who was killed in the First World War, but nothing that reflects his own career as a teacher. No qualifications behind glass to recall the achievements of the boy from the large impoverished family who had initially failed his 11-plus, but nevertheless managed to become a Bachelor of Arts by correspondence and then a Master of Arts.

  Ray Honeyford
Ray Honeyford was vilified for his views

There are no photographs of him pictured with his students. But that was all a long time ago now. Mr Honeyford, 72, “retired” more than 20 years ago as the headmaster of a school in Bradford. Or, at least, that was when he was vilified by politically correct race “experts”, was sent death threats, and condemned as a racist. Eventually, he was forced to resign and never allowed to teach again.

His crime was to publish an article in The Salisbury Review in 1984 doubting whether the children in his school were best served by the connivance of the educational authorities in such practices as the withdrawal of children from school for months at a time in order to go ”home” to Pakistan, on the grounds that such practices were appropriate to the children’s native culture. In language that was sometimes maladroit, he drew attention, at a time when it was still impermissible to do so, to the dangers of ghettoes developing in British cities.

More:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml;jsessionid=KZKAEYUBB43OLQFIQMGCFF4AVCBQUIV0?xml=/news/2006/08/27/nmulticul27.xml

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